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the major powers, china has a key role to play here. japan, would like to see russia for a more helpful. obviously, the united nations, security council still has a role to play in many issues as it celebrates its next set of actions. but we have to, together, find a way to make sure that the kim family regime doesn't feel invulnerable when it improves its march towards a nuclearized icbm. when it improves its capabilities through provocations to the region. we need, in other words, an offense not just a defense. to put it in a different way. we have to shift from what has been defensive containment that's been very leaky because of cooperation with iran proliferation off the peninsula with the fact we have not stopped this long march to a capability, to an offensive containment strategy where the united states, especially its key allies, south korea and japan, augment in the first instance, a defensive posture, through improved and more integrated intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance through ballistic missile capability, through a readiness to deal with provocations across the
. we need china's support because chinese banks are harboring some of the ill-gotten gains, the illicit gains of north korea. and if china wanted really to put the screws for kim jong-un and his inner circle they could tighten up some of those bank accounts overnight and would send a very quick swift signal that there is a price to be paid for provocation, and if you want to deal with the world as it is, you're going to convoy from this provocation and a different direction, even if you can't open up your country overnight without reform. anyway, we have to remain open to real change. we do need a political exit ramp eventually from this horror story in north korea, not to suggest we're trying to seek rapid regime change. we are not seeking more. we are not seek rapid regime change. win a silver light on old measures, but we do have to bring all of these instruments of policy to bear in a more effective strategy. in china, which has to be fitting on a new assessment of north korea. it's north korean ally. on the one hand, they may be saying yes, north korea's nuclear weapons state and a
media sites. at the recent world economic forum in switzerland participates discuss china's economic future and the policy changes needed to move the country forward. ists including -- analysts included economic professors from china and the u.s. the role world economic forum is anen yule event this is about an hour. [inaudible conversations] welcome from inside economic forum. the party congress has said the very ambition goal for all -- [inaudible] and. we'll ask whether how it can be achieved over the next hour. [inaudible] [inaudible] >> translator: i'm going to divide the one hour in to three parts. first we're going to talk about whether the vision could be achieved. what our major challenge and the reasons and the second part will be reform. and so i want to discuss about the priorities of reform that is how to set the reform lastly welcome to talk about the government. we have to talk about the role of the government and also what is the expectations of our -- on the new administration and also ten to fifteen minutes for the audience. let me introduce the five distinguished g
the economies of europe, japan, china, and south korea. next, on booktv. this is a little over an hour.ro ba okay. it is great tock be back at the society. >> for 25 years now, we enjoy a terrific relationship with the a japan society in so manyys wayse ved quudible] bed we have lived quite a bit o time in this is great to be with you let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to me about this -- when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about, lessons of debt cry cease and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot in what we needed to be able to do. so we were able to convince him, and so now i'm not talking to you as his friend, i'm talking to you as his publisher. [laughter] and we had this decision, you know, we were going to do this book, and we kid. and we did. now, the ink wasn't even dry on this book when
of europe, japan, china and south korea. next on booktv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it's great to be back at the japan society, and we enjoy our relationship that way. tokyo, for the mcgraw-hill companies, has been the headquarters of our asia pacific operations for 25 years now, and we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot concern in a lot of different ways. one of many by colleagues is with me, doug peterson, who just joined us from citi, and he is heading up standard & poor's ratings, and we welcome you, doug. and doug has lived with citi all over the world and as such as lived quite a bit of time in japan itself. so it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to me about this -- when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about, lessons of d
how china will surpass us. he said that in the florida senate in 2011 and how we need each other. but that's diplomacy comest you can get a bit of a pass. senator hagel, key was had by the executive commission on china, but talk solely about development issues. rule of law and economic growth is fine. but that's not the job he's getting. he said absolutely nothing about the rise of china. he's also said absolutely nothing about he has had the defense department is going to do with the rise of china in an era of budget cuts to the defense department he supports. it's very troubling, fred has a great way of putting this consensus reality that in a sense it doesn't matter. so did not do the job better and you can take that for granted. japan for the first time in a decade has not just her and run defense budget, modestly $1.6 billion increase. it would be nice to see it continue, but everyone watches very carefully to see the leading indicator, which is us and what we're willing to do. taiwan is a country rushing to the exit to make sure nothing comes between it and china and theref
in the pacific. not just about china, but about some of the intraasian problem that is we're seeing. and if you can doing what our economists at aei absolutely revile, link it back to some of of the, you know, economic questions that we face and the prosperity that we've gotten used to up to a point? >> thanks. well, first,ing now you know how asia feels in these discussions, always sort of last, and when attention comes, it's sort of quick. [laughter] >> this is why you grew a beard. >> exactly. let me, let me mention three things. that i think will be on the radar that we should be aware of. and then link it, actually, back to the broader discussion, what dani asked about the economics. um, so, you know, if tom was talking about the immediate game and fred was talking about the short-term game, asia sees itself as the long-term game. and they sue -- they view what's going on there in those terms. of it's not something that -- well, whatever i'm about to mention, they don't think it's going to be resolved tomorrow. they don't think that the trends they're dealing with are at any point in time
challenges facing the economies of europe, japan, china, and south korea. next on book tv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it is great to be back. we enjoyed our relationship that way. tokyo has been the headquarters of our asia-pacific operations for 25 years now. we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot of different ways. one of my colleagues who is with me, doug peterson who just joined us from the city, and he is setting up. we welcome you, doug. dougie is all over the world. as such, he has lived quite a bit of time in japan himself. it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see. in terms of this whole notion of the book, by the way, a very modest title, banker to the world. when i heard of this, and i am a very close, personal friend of bill's, like everyone in this room is. and so when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about to lessons of debt crises and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot, what we needed to the will to do. so we were able to convince them. so no i'm not talking
the discussion on china's increasing cyber attacks on the u.s. from today's "washington journal." >> host: john reed is a foreign policy national security reporter for "foreign policy" magazine. good morning. thanks for being with us. this headline from the new times are good as we, a 60 page report looking at china's role in cybersecurity. if you review the report with the children? >> guest: it was more fascinating piece of evidence, something we've all known has been going on for years and years and years if you been paying attention to cybersecurity. we saw proof that, very strong evidence of leaking of the chinese government to actual theft of intellectual property. you hear a story about defense contractors networks being penetrated by hackers who are in china and then a few years later it looked an awful lot like an american stealth fighter. this is the first time you could see it point at a building in china as a this is a building owned by the chinese government and say this is likely where this is coming from and here's what they're doing and here is what they're stealing. it gave tha
wonder if you just talk a little bit about what we see in the pacific, not just about china, but about some of the inner asian problems that we are seeing. and if you can, doing what our comments today are talking about, linking it back to some of the economic questions that we face in the prosperity that we have gotten used to up to a point. >> well, first of all, we know how asia feels in this discussion. when attention comes, it is very quick and it's get it over with as soon as you can. >> this is why you grow a beard. [laughter] >> let me mention three things. three things that will be on the radar we should be aware of here in washington dc. then we can actually get back to the broader discussion. so if tom was talking about the media game, asia sees itself as a long-term game. they view what is going on here in those terms. it's not something -- they don't think it's going to be resolved tomorrow. whether it's not just china, it's japan and india, at southeast asia looking over long-term to understand what the correlation and balance of power is going to become. so part of the f
order issued earlier this month and the increasing number of cyber attacks on the u.s. from china. then a discussion about nuclear weapons in the middle east and america's declining influence in the region. after that we're live with the closing session of the nation's governors' annual winter meeting as they discuss personal responsibility in relation to government policies with their guest, tv's dr. oz. and later the senate returns at 2 eastern following its weeklong presidents' day recess when senator kelly ayotte delivers the annual reading of george washington's farewell address. >> at age 25, she was one of the wealthiest widows in the colonies, and during the revolution while many her mid '40s, she was of considered an enemy by the british who threatened to take her host aage. later she would become our nation's first first lady at age 57. meet martha washington tonight in the first program of c-span's new weekly series, "first ladies: influence and image." we'll visit some of the places that influenced her life including colonial williamsburg, mount vernon, valley forge an
a hobby. >> host: you have some of that in the book. taking it to china taking it to palestine, how did you write a play, go through all you had to go through three different governments to do and what it and what was the reception and most respected areas? >> guest: in china one of my former students was there so that was the accident. i had visited her and she was fluent in chinese. she was there for a long period of time and she had seen danny glover before. i had written a script at that time. he read the script and she said well look, why can't we do this in china? it would really be a great impact to bring king. so the national leader of china. >> host: what year is this? >> guest: this was 2007 and we performed it in the theater less than two miles from tiananmen square. >> host: in chinese? >> guest: in chinese. we were performing the birmingham protests with the chinese martin luther king and all of this is taking place before packed audiences within walking distance of tiananmen square. so translating king's legacy and ringing a gospel choir you know -- and i have actually thr
members that include the united states, china, it includes russia. russia is really neither an economic or military superpower except in regards to its nuclear arsenal. and then we have friends and britain and here we have two very much medium powers that are not economic heavyweights, you still exert a great deal of forward and influence in world affairs. a large part of that as leverage they security council itself. we have no india, no brazil, no party from outside this kind of frozen group. and this is, i think, an enormous problem for the security council and one that there's probably no structural way to overcome. the reason why is pretty simple. if you say to any of the current members, why did she set on down, france and britain come you guys had to combine in a single european union fee. and then there's a lot of hemming and hauling it in the meantime, germany pops up and says pet, we are actually one of the world's great economic superpowers. we have no military to speak of and we cannot do anything, but we pay for everything, so we actually deserve a seat. she say we know how
of new stories in the last couple of days in washington and around the country about china and the headlines are often, china has attacked. a big cover story in bloomberg as well. is this policy directed toward china? >> guest: no, it's not directed at anyone specific country. it's really directed at the broad range of threats that we face in cyberspace that stem from any number of frankly domestic and overseas actors. so it's really not targeting any one individual country. >> host: when we see the headlines saying china attacks, what does that mean? who is behind that? >> guest: well, it's hard for me to speculate on what might be behind some of that. i think it's undoubtedly true that we have seen actors that are based in china carry out activities. but we have seen that in multiple countries around the world and the attribution problem continues to be difficult in cyberspace. so i think from the administration's side, we try not to focus as much on those sorts of headlines. we really focus on improving our cybersecurity defenses across-the-board so we can't afford whate
countries-pat spoke with leaders about her husband's upcoming tariff to -- trip to china, explaining he was trying to open a dialogue, and she reiterate america's promise of financial assistance and announced the creation of two grad walt scholarships for women to travel to the united states to study. not her official pronouncements that earned her the accolades, either in the country she visit or back home. it was her warmth, enthusiasm, general win appreciation of and affection for the people she met in monrovia, she said she could not wait to meet people. she did that. she waded into crowds, shaking hands, and giving hugs. at the inauguration ceremony she gave the president a cheek-to-cheek embrace. he called her, quote, woman with strength of spirit and fortitude of character, when a group of women presented her with cloths, rather than just slipping it under her chair, she stood up and began to tie it around her waste. the women got up and came up to help her and dressed her in the traditional clothing. pat's delight in her outfit and her willingness to 0 model spoke volumes out ab
people, combined i.q. of a couple hundred. anyway, the notion we have a deficit in china is wrong. we actually have a surplus. why? san francisco in july of last year estimated 55% of chinese imports have american content. in other words, offshore. if you take that figure from the chinese figure, up goes the u.s. by 220 billion. a good example of that is apple. iphone and ipod are made in china. however, 66% u.s. content and 3% chinese or which i'm sure is taiwanese. so why are these figures not been taken into account? >> i think this story with all due respect is vastly overblown. ken kramer at you see irvine has been the best research into that. the real issue is not u.s. or china. it's japan and taiwan that they end up getting more value-added. when you look at trade numbers, they trade system when apple sells ip or experts, that's included in the trade system. when we moved apart to china to dissemble, that's an exporter. the whole thing is included as an import. so i do think those numbers are anywhere near as for this you would suggest. >> okay. i think we are going to end this
out in the society to take care of the elderly. china already has a slow motion catastrophe where you are going to have literally hundreds of millions of people who are elderly with no state support whatsoever in the pension health care and very little money to support them because as the one child policy they have one of their own and so what are the chinese we do? and it's a terrifying question. >> host: if you are convinced this is a ruling disaster of some kind, what works or what doesn't, what can the government do to encourage women or families to have more children? >> guest: that's how we sell books. people have been trying to do this for all long time. caesar augustus past the bachelor tax to get people married and have kids and that didn't work. they have a fertility problem and they have a motherhood metal to have five or more children. you can get them on ebay. they've spent the better part working hard. the other countries say the fertility rates aren't that hot and they have the rate of 6.1 to 6.7. all the evidence suggests that is because of innovation and they have a g
to canada and all the way out through japan and china and korea and the conversation was completely different. was about global trade and freeing trade. and i actually always thought that in that sense the country had more in common with their asian counterparts than their latin american counterparts. it is how they perceive themselves as a state of development and significance there. i think it is because if you look at the places like chile now quite developed in many ways, colombia getting there in terms of the development, a country like brazil was interesting because on the one hand, it is leading the global, one of the leaders in the global economy, but with huge income distribution, difficulties that keep it really more on developing countryside. if you look at some of the poorest countries in the central america like a guatemala for instance, you are talking about places you can't reach the farmers in the high land by the highway, and so their problems are to try to build infrastructure so that they can july and the 20th century economy cannot forget the 21st century economy
, and china has one carrier, that is from the ukrainian navy. i don't know how good they feel about serving in this aircraft carrier, that is exactly what they had. we have over 200 bases and facilities, china has nothing outside of china itself. .. the kid saved a couple hundred billion dollars over the next ten years by reducing that to reasonable 360,000 soldiers. so there are just some of the things that could be done that could get you to that trillion dollars figure that people say would really disarmed the united states. no, it wouldn't. now, 4,807,000,000,000 has already been agreed to by the senate and house of the next ten years of sequestration that would involve another 4,902,000,000,000 which would get you close to trillion, but there won't be a sequestration. so that kind of cutback we will see, and we don't see anyone in the pentagon really working toward this. leon panetta has never really asked for it. so this creates a serious problem. now, demilitarization is a more important issue because what we have done is militarize the entire national security process i have a chapt
our sovereignty said china, the u.s., now canada, even leaders doesn't permit us to monitor. doesn't permit us to report to international body. doesn't permit an international body to tell us what to do with emission. sovereignty has become the obstacle to cooperation and increasely made states look more and more dysfunctional. how is that the most powerful, well equipped military nation in the world has ever seen the united states of america can't bring a handful of terrorists to heal in benghazi or mali, or afghanistan. the asymmetry between a massive military based on big ships, planes, and bombs and the reality of every day -- cross borders that a symmetry means that the war machine, the war machine of the greatest state there ever was is largelier relevant to the security threats we face. as we learn on 9/11 when in this city, a handful of hijackers living in the united states for years hijacked our planes and turned them to weapons. they didn't have to be given weapons by anyone. they seize them and use them and created devastation here. that, again, is a sign of this new asy
percentage of products come from the developing world especially china and walmart and these food processors and grain traders were the biggest proponents of globalizing the food system. they find it advantageous to process, grow food where it is cheaper in countries where environmental laws are weaker and they have an easier time dictating policy and increasingly our foods are being produced in these countries and if you are talking about organics it is very difficult to verify in the u.s. that organic products are meeting standards so we can imagine how this is happening in places like china. basically what we are advocating and the reason i wrote "foodopoly" is that we need to do more, it is great that the local foods movement is valuable. i have a farm, we love our farm, we love people coming out but we don't envision that our farm or the farmers' markets in the d.c. area will never be able to feed the entire population because you have to be able to focus these products and these grocery stores and the distribution chains have a stranglehold so we need to add antitrust law to our good f
or the power in the world so they include the united states, china, and includes russia but russia is neither an economic or military superpower accept in regards to its use nuclear arsenal. then we have france and britain, and here we have the median of powers that are not economic heavyweights in the world and yet still exert a great deal of force in the world affairs a great deal of influence on world affairs but a large part of that is actually a leveraged by the security council itself. we have no india, we have no prez sell -- brazil, no party outside of this kind of frozen grouper and this is i think again the enormous problem for the security council and no structural way to overcome. the reason why is pretty simple. why don't you step on down. there is a lot and in the meantime germany pops up and says we are one of the world's greatest economic superpowers and we can't do anything from the marshall standpoint but we pay for everything so we deserve a seat we dhaka the military either we should have a seat because we are an economic superpower and some very powerful country which say
there to take care of the elderly. china -- china already has what is called a slow-motion human catastrophe where you are going to have literally hundreds of millions of people who are elderly with no state support whatsoever in terms of pension and health care and very little money to support them because they have this one-child policy and almost no progeny of their own. so what are the chinese going to do with her old people? it's a terrifying question. >> host: well, if you are convinced that this is a disaster of some kind what works and what doesn't? what can be done? what if anything can the government do to encourage women or families to have more children? >> guest: [inaudible] that is how we sell books. [laughter] people have been trying to do this for a long time. seasseas are augusta saw they ha fertility problem and the empire. he tried to get people to get married and have kids and it didn't work or that the soviet union had a fertility problem so stalin commissioned a motherhood medal giving it out to women who had five or more children. you can get them on ebay for $5 today
, especially fingerpointing in china and other countries. in this chapter i basically emphasized that other countries, do as i say, not as i did. and from the very good go america's motive industrialization was not focusing first on domestic innovation, but actually aggressive, widespread, enthusiastic, overt theft of european, especially british technologies. alexander hamilton was the most enthusiastic proponent, aulos official state policy, the need to go out and do this. interestingly enough another brown brother has a crucial role year, not john brown, the bad brother, the slave trader, the property from the war, but denies brown brother, the quaker, the pacifist, the abolitionist, moses brown. moses brown hired samuel slater. simulator is considered the grandfather of the american industrial revolution. he has been credited. prole in overstatement. but cut it would appeal any side and he will be credited to my tab forever in history. well, who? the smuggle himself in the fines of extraordinary strict british innovation loss that did not allow machinists skilled artisans like insult to
to acknowledge its discriminations in tibet or in western china against the uyghur people. many nations hide from their past but we owe people the truth. we owe them their history and we owed them repair and we are not doing that. not only that, we don't even want to talk about it as a society. >> host: you say that this loss of heritage is comparable to the holocaust and some of the other genocides. >> guest: the holocaust was 12 years. this was 246 years plus the century that people lost where they lost their languages. they. they lost their culture, they lost everything. many people had their severed. people lost their tongues. thomas jefferson when he was a boy at two years old had a relationship with a 14-year-old girl, sally hammonds, that he owned and wasn't from the -- we know what it would be called today. that was routine. we lost any idea of who we were. it was our past, our memory was banished and we worked ourselves to an early death. rebuilt the capital, built the white house, and doubt harvard law school which was endowed by isaac royal from the proceeds and the sale of slaves that
on china and threats from terrorists and rogue nations. he will be speaking at george washington university, and that starts at 6:30 p.m. with the u.s. in the unbreakable is week we're featuring some of booktv's we can programs on prime time here on c-span2. tonight former iraq and afghanistan general begins at 8 p.m. eastern with stanley mcchrystal and then fred kaplan, david petraeus, also jeffrey engel discusses a collection of essays on the goal for. >> the economy is at china basin is communism in name only these days. it's to preserve the power of the members of the communist party. but they basically threw most of the ideology aside when deng xiaoping opened the country up and is now a capitalist haven. the communism in china, they talk the talk at great length of these party congresses about marxism, leninism, to do. it's all about preserving the party power economic as a country continues to grow because they threw aside the most vestiges of common is alongside the in north korea it's all about preserving the power of the military and the kim dynasty as you have there. and again, i
. for the spectator in a a row, china is our major export destination. remarkable growth they are since 2005 exports to china have been growing by 25% annually and they are now our top export market. if you look at what we're sending to china, no surprise it's dominated by and cotton. they have accounted in recent years as much as three quarters of total trade to china. but if you look at not minor, but still quite large exports for things like wars screens, corn for example, if you look at steve, distilled or dried grains other red meats, ec does are showing growth figures as well. in terms of overall exports, values are up for most of the commodity categories. again, these are experts on night fiscal year basis. you can see for most of these categories with one exception being core and, but largely the fair price driven events. we do see volumes up for some categories, but for most individual commodity categories we see lower volumes. the drought obviously having some effect but for most of the commodities being offset by higher prices for values thereof. the big difference though is this horrid a
shock when he saw with the final cost will be. 11 aircraft carriers and task force china has one carrier and that is from the ukraine navy i don't know how they feel about serving on this aircraft carrier but that is what they have. they have over 200 bases and facilities nothing outside of china itself. the marines are larger and more powerful than the british military. when is the last time they conducted the landing the degette a lot of their support for? 1951, the courier and war that they had, they were talking about an expeditionary fighting vehicle. they are getting enough 35 and that is another thing about what we do. every service has its own air force so in addition, you have the army, the navy, the marine corps that has their own capability in terms of the air force. finally, you have the army structure at 547,000. you could save a couple hundred billion dollars over the next ten years by reducing that to a reasonable 360,000. so those are just some of the things that could be done that could get you to the trillion dollar figure that some people would say would disarm the uni
the south china sea to the eastern mediterranean to keep the world's energy market stable. now this has been helped quite significantly by the increase in our own domestic production. it's no accident that is as the iranian oil has gone off-line because of our sanctions other sources have come on line so iran cannot in a fit from increased prices. then there is human rights and our support for democracy and the rule of law. levers of power and values we cannot afford to ignore. in the last century the united states where it led the world in recognizing universal rights exist and that governments are obligated to protect them. now we have placed ourselves at the frontline of today's emerging battle like the fight to defend the human rights of the lgbt communities around the world and religious minorities wherever and whoever they are. but it not a coincidence that virtually every country that threatens regional and global peace is a place where human rights are in peril or the rule of law as we. more specifically places where women and girls are treated as second-class marginal human beings.
the sequester would result the communism of china is coming to name these days and it preserves the power of the members of the communist party but they basically through most ideology aside whether he opened the country up and is now become a capitalist haven, the communism now in china they talked at great length that the congress is about marxist lennon etc. but it's all about preserving the party's power economically as the country continues to grow because they threw aside most vestiges of communism a long time ago. and north korea, it's all about preserving the power of the military and the kim dynasty and it has nothing to do with what karl marx vision of communism way back. it's a fascinating book somehow on how communism when it moved into asia it diverged into something different in vietnam, cambodia, north korea, and the communism that appeared in europe and eastern european countries that is an absolutely fascinating split that occurred now the public affairs channel and the magazine hosted a discussion on u.s.-canadian relations. speakers include the canadian ambassador to th
believe down to your core that the u.s. will be there, that does more to deter war with china, and all other party than anything else. the moment you believe the u.s. didn't believe the own even symbolic statements you start thinking about that much harder. i would say the class between the new liberal realist and the idealist within the obama administration has been fantastically costly to the u.s.' long-term position. not because the realism is wrong because it's realism that believes it can have if all ways. have the cake and eat it too. it can say whatever it wants and ignore opportunity road. >> host: what is your background? >> guest: a law professor hered at american university. i teach a combination of both business law and actually don't really teach international law courses and public international law. i'm a visiting fellow at the hoover institution in california and a nonresidence senior fellow here at the brookings institution in washington, d.c. mostly national security. the book i'm proud to say was published by the hoover institution press. and i have a background that
a trade balance of almost $30 billion, 29.5. now, for the second year in a row china's our major export destination. remarkable growth there. since 2005 exports to china have been growing by about 20% annually, and so now that they are now our top export market. if you look at what we're sending to china, no surprise, it's dominated by soybeans and cotton. they account, have accounted in recent years as much as three-quarters of total trade to china. but if you look at some of the minor but still quite large other exports for things like coarse grains -- corn, for example -- if you look at feeds and fodders, distilled or dried grains, for example, or red meats, you see that those are showing impressive growth figures as well. in terms of overall exports, values are up for most of the commodity categories. again, these are exports on a fiscal year basis. you can see that up for most of these categories with the one exception being corn, and we'll get into corn. but largely these are price-driven events. we do see volumes up for some categories, but for most of the individual commodity ca
to resolve energy disputes from the south china sea to the eastern mediterranean to keep the world's energy market stable. now this has been helped quite significantly by the increase in their own domestic production. it's no accident that is iranian oil has gone off-line because of our sanctions other sources have come on line so iran cannot and if it from increased prices. then there is human rights and our support for democracy and the rule of law, levers of power and values we cannot afford to ignore. in the last century the united states led the world in recognizing that universal rights exist and that governments are obligated to protect them. now we have placed ourselves at the front lines of today's emerging battles like the fight to defend the human rights of the lgbt communities around the world and religious minorities wherever and whoever they are. but it's not a coincidence that virtually every country that threatens regional and global peace is a place where human rights are in peril or the rule of law is weak. more specifically, places where women and girls are treated as sec
public schools china and india 220 days of instruction and in the united states it is only 180 days? that is drastic between china and india 40 +-- per year if you multiply that kindergarten through 12th grade it is a big disadvantage. >> guest: people say what do we need to save the education? in my opinion you have to put every single resource there and it is the resources of time. if you look at the schools in this country whether traditional, a charter schools, they are in school more and have their kids working and after school and on weekends we are still living on the agrarian calendar. literally it is interesting somebodies said on a talk show the other day or applaud that said the u.s. is not doing worse than what it was doing before but she is right when you looked at the fact academic achievement levels of the kids in the '60s and '70s is pretty much on par with where we are today. it is true from that vantage point* we're not worse but the problem is there are countries that are leapfrog ahead of fiat the head of west lafayette and liechtenstein are both growing two or t
to nebraska on my summer that a trade mission to china. we can do need to expand and strengthen a relationship to china, just like canada, mexico, japan and many other countries. during the past few years, nebraska asked for to china have grown rapidly in china is no nebraska's fourth-largest trading partner. the nebraska china relationship is just beginning and i'm confident this will be a growing and improving relationship for many years to come. as we continue to make state government more efficient and accessible to citizens, how to recognize professionals throughout state government for what they do. from online motor vehicle registration renewals to our 511 system that provides immediate and accurate information about current road conditions, our goal is to provide more and better technology in the future. i'm also pleased to share with you our efforts to have state workers make wellness a part of their everyday lives. we offer an innovative bonus program in a health insurance package designed around wildness. in 2012, the state of nebraska wellness program became the first and only stat
thing was to deal with china, which you could do separate from negotiations and separate root from all the processes because really that's, china is just a huge emitter. and, you can't deal with the problem without them. i mean you can't deal without us either but you can't deal without them. he might make that a focus. that might improve things. but really, maybe some difference. i wouldn't say a lot. >> and from your time back in the state department in the clinton years you were involved in some early efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions. i don't know if you have any perspective on less sorns learned -- lessons learned in the approach tried then. >> i think we made a number of mistakes. it was me at least in part. what did we really learn? i think the most important lesson from kyoto is you can not negotiate a treaty unless you're prepared to do stuff at home to meet the requirements. and i think, it wasn't enough thinking that went into what it is that the u.s. was prepared to do domestically before kyoto was negotiated. and then of course we had other reasons it was never subm
technological achievement are behind us and if other nations like china and india will surpass us or perhaps already have. some nations are creating environments so attractive to global manufacturers that companies have relocated much of their activities on foreign soil. our global trade imbalance is do growing as we export less and import more. and today the imbalance includes many high-tech products. other nations are changing their policy to become more competitive and so should we. fortunately blazing trails in to new frontiers is what america has always done best. to set the stage for the congress and to understand where america is heading, we have very knowledgeable witnesses testifying before us today. each of them understands both the public and private research and development efforts as well as where our global competitors are headed. members of the committee have the opportunity to work together on policies that will help america stay competitive. and today's hearing is the first step. that concludes my opening statement. and gentlewoman from texas is recognized. >> thank you very
china, russia and some of the mideast countries want to have more government involvement in the development of the internet. the u.s.-led involvement in the internet, they're concerned about the multi-stakeholder private-sector governance of the internet which i think has led to the internet's wonders of the great development of that and i'm very much on the side of the united states on this. and by the way this is one area in which the republicans or democrats, this is the one area that they can easily agree on. now on the other hand some republicans point to exactly the point that you make and that is there is some hypocrisy here. we are saying hey wait a minute we want a free network that on the other hand we want rules like network neutrality here domestically and we won't want to have the government involved in the international sphere. i think on the other hand some folks who support the network neutrality rules would say there is quite a difference between those two instances and that would not be a fair comparison. i probably am on the side of the import to your q
the through decide when he opened up the country and it's become a capital haven. the communism now in china they talked at great length devotees about marxist etc. but it's all about preserving the power economically as the country continues to grow because they threw aside the vestiges of communism a long time ago. in north korea is about preserving the power of the military and the dynasty as you have there and again, it really has nothing to do with i think what is envisioned as communism we back. it could be a fascinating book on how communism when it moved diverged into something different in vietnam, cambodia, laos, north korea, then the communism in europe it's a fascinating split that occurred. >> "washington post" correspondent now harvard fellow richard on 34 years of reporting on the insight from our dhaka the world. sunday >>> the supreme court ruled unanimously today that a drug sniffing dog alert is sufficient probable cause to legally justify a search of someone's vehicle. the justice in her opinion for the court said that the question is whether all of the facts surrounding
. china is already happening it's already happening what they call a slow motion human catastrophe. where you are going have hundred of millions, literally hundreds of mills of -- millions of people who are elderly with no state support whatsoever in terms of pension and health care. and very little money to support them. they have as one child policy almost no project any of their own. what are the chinese going do with the old people? it's a terrifying question. >> host: if you're convinced it's a rolling datesser ever some kind. what works or what doesn't? what can be done? what, if anything, could the government to do encourage families to have more children? >> guest: nothing works. we're doomed. that's how we -- so people have been trying to do this for a long time. caesar agust ties saw he had a fertility problem. he passed a tax thing to make people have more problems. the soviet union had a medal to women to who had five or more children. you can get them on ebay now. they are cool. they didn't work. as i said in france and the nordic countries have spent a better part of the eig
for because everybody else was coming from india and china. which is a great thing. i wish we had more native-born americans get into the hard sciences, but we need to welcome people from throughout the world to come here and get an education. do you agree with that, secretary duncan? >> absolutely. >> and, secretary napolitano, we should make it easy for them to stay and be part of our country, do you agree with that? >> absolutely. >> i just don't see how we fix our immigration and education system if we're going to cut the budget like this. one final question. if we found ourselves in sort of budgetary triage where we keep doing this dumb thing and this dumb thing a momentum of -- has a momentum of its own and begins to take a life of its own and i'm up here having to decide where the money goes, would you agree with me, secretary duncan -- and i know you don't like this position you would find yourself in -- that if i had to pick between the secretary, the d., the d. of education and the department of defense, i should pick the department of defense over your department? >> again, i think
intellectual property theft debate, finger-pointing at china and other countries. i basically emphasize is do is they say, not as they did and from the get-go, america's mode of industrialization was not focusing first on domestic innovation, but aggressive widespread enthusiastic over past, especially british technologies. alexander hamilton was the most enthusiastic upon it, almost official state policy to go out and do this. interestingly enough, in other brown brother has a crucial role here. not john brown the bad rather come the slave trader, profiteer, but the nice brother, the quaker, pacifists, abolitionists. how did mrs. brown play a role here? he hired samuel slater. they are considered the grandfather of the american industrial revolution. probably an overstatement, but go to wikipedia and he will be credited. he actually smuggled himself out of england in defiance of extraordinarily strict british immigration laws that did not allow machine has come artisan precisely because if he did would end up helping countries other than england. smuggled himself to new york. heard about him
and elegy bt activists here today from china and taiwan. [applause] [applause] [applause] [applause] i look forward to spend time with them. we went through a lot of pizzas, and i have to tell you, i am so inspired by your vision and your creativity and your drive. they are the founders of the lgb t movement in china and taiwan, and we welcome you. [applause] again and again we show up for each other, add new people to our family and unfortunately at times this members of our family. we have had an unusual number of deaths this year. our staff and board members lost parents, grandparents, a key task force volunteers and tragically a child. and we lost a dear friend and co-worker in san the green who, as many of you know, was an extraordinary woman who worked for the task force for a decade and greeted people at creating change at the registration desk every year. sandy, sandy was not afraid to say there was a black straight woman and was part of a family working for civil rights for all [applause] iso wish -- i so wished she could have seen the president's speech. she would have loved it. b
in two nay and the china diary of george h.w. bush, making of the global president published by princeton university press in 2008. the whole reform with one of our manufacturers with the strategic studies institute and 20 times and he wrote to follow the berlin while the revolutionary legacy of 1989, published by oxford university press in 2009. obviously a mission that the bush school, but it we know he's doing well asset me. i would now like to suggest are going to have a reintroduction to dr. jeff said are you coming up on stage. before he brings his earmarks were going to see a video and this is a pretty significant video because its video in president bush's own words and it chronicles the events following the invasion of kuwait. i would take you now to pay attention to this video and after it's over, we'll have just single, contact to us. thank you very much. [applause] >> in the early-morning hours of august at akkad, following negotiations and promises iraq's dictator, saddam hussein not to use force, a powerful iraqi army invaded it stressed and much weaker neighbor, kuwait. wit
don't pay them what they're worth. >> in australia they have 200 days of public school. in china and india, it's 220 days of public school instruction. in the united states, why do you think in the united states it's only 180 days? which is drastically, if you take between china and india, it's 40 less days a year, and if you multiply that from -- >> [inaudible] >> through 12th grade and stuff, it's a big advantage. >> so it's no wonder they're kicking our butts. i mean, it really isn't. you know, people all the time talk about, well, what do we need in order to fix education in and in my opinion you have to put every single resource to bear to solve this problem. and the resource that people underestimate is the resource of time. and i think that if you look at the schools in this country that do the best whether they be traditional public schools, charter schools, etc., they are in school more time. they have their kids working before school, after school, on weekends, etc. , and we have 180-day calendar because we're still living off the agrarian calendar. i mean, literally, i
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